How To Grow Ginger In Pot | Growing Ginger Indoors

Growing ginger in a pot is easy! It’s a great idea if you live in a cool temperate climate or you don’t have a plenty of space.

If you live in USDA Zone 9b and above or any other subtropical or tropical climates around the globe you can easily grow ginger as a perennial both on the ground and in a container year round. If you live below Zone 9b and down to USDA Zone 7b, please note that the leaves of the ginger plants growing outside on the ground will die but come back again after the winter. Below the Zone 7 or in any other cooler part you live, you may need to grow ginger in pots to keep the plant indoors in winters.

Ginger is a warm climate spice or herb, like garlic or turmeric, it is termed as SUPERFOOD. It has anti-inflammatory and anti-biotic properties. It’s ability to expedite the digestion power is well-known.

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Growing Ginger in Pots

Growing ginger roots is easy, find or purchase fresh ginger rhizomes (roots), measuring almost 3 to 5 inches. Look for pieces with growth buds or eyes. These little green buds look similar to that of potatoes. Store-bought ginger is sometimes treated with growth retardant chemicals so it’s a good idea that you keep the rhizomes in water overnight or for a few hours.

Planting and Propagation

The best time to start growing ginger is spring, however, if you live in a frost-free warm climate you can try to grow ginger in container anytime but the best time is an early wet season.

Plant the rhizomes (2-3 cm) 1 inch deep in the potting soil with the buds facing upwards. Ginger plants will start to emerge in a couple of weeks. It is noted that the ginger plants gets up to four to five feet tall.

Choosing a Pot

For growing ginger, choose a medium sized 14-15 inches pot that is deep rather than shallow to provide the ample space to roots to grow.

Requirements for Growing Ginger in Pot

Position

In its natural climate, ginger is known to be grown in partial sun, so it’s a good idea that you keep your pot in a spot that receives full sun but shade in afternoon. However, if you live in a really cold climate keep the plant in a sunny spot.

Soil

Loose, well drained, and sandy-loamy soil that is rich in compost is best for growing ginger indoors or outdoors in a pot. Soil that blocks the moisture must be avoided.

Watering

The ginger plant requires deep and regular watering as it prefers slightly moist soil. However, it should be noted that overwatering and waterlogging may thwart the growth and cause the root rot. Also, watering should be reduced in winter.

Temperature

As ginger prefers a warm climate it can’t tolerate drafts and cold temperature, it is advised to keep your ginger plants indoors when the temperature starts to dip below the level of 50 F (10 C).

Plant Care

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It requires to cut off a finger and ensure that the section is at least 2 inches in length. Then the cut pieces are dried for a couple of days in a warm place before putting them in ground.

Fertilizer

Ginger requires soil that is rich in organic matter, you can top the pot with compost or well-rotted manure. Additionally, you can apply all-purpose fertilizer during the growing season.

Pests and Diseases

Pests including white grub, shoot borer, shoot boring weevil attack the ginger plant. It is also attacked by bacterial wilt, soft rot, dry rot and leaf spot viruses. It is highly recommended to keep the plant safe from these diseases and pests.

Harvesting

Your ginger roots are going to get ready for harvest within 8-10 months, once the leaves start to become yellow.


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Growing ginger in a pot is easy! It's a great idea if you live in a cool temperate climate or you don't have a plenty of space.



2 COMMENTS

  1. It’s wonderful to grow ginger in pots. I tried it last year in 5 pots and was successful. In fact, I already earned from it and plan to plant another in my recycled bath tub. Thank you so much Pinterest for the insights.

  2. Hi there,
    I found this article and what appeared to be your entire website on a site called “Notey.” I had pinned your graphic on Pinterest so I’m going back to redirect the graphic to your site. I am not familiar with “Notey” but because I am a blogger also, I am always on the lookout for scraper sites! Just thought you would want to know.

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