Overwintering Lavender | Quick Tips

Lavender is a perennial herb that loves dry and warm growing space. Most often it dies in winter due to lack of care but overwintering lavender is easy if you follow these quick tips.

Overwintering Lavender

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1. Most of the times lavender plants die off due to the wet and waterlogged soil in winter. Take care to grow your lavenders in a dry well-drained soil.

2. If your soil is heavy add lot of compost, organic matter and sand in it to improve its texture.

3. Grow lavender in the South facing location of your garden as south part remains 5 to 10 degrees warmer in compare to other directions.

4. Cut back the flower stalks down to the leaves when flowers begin to fade so that the plant doesn’t consume its energy in them.

5. Just before frost and winter arrives prune your lavender plant to one third of its height, at least three weeks prior to first frost date to reduce its size and density.

6. When the temperature dip below the freezing point, do heavy mulching and cover lavenders 50-70% with straws and leaves for insulation.

7. Remove the mulch and let the fresh air flow in when all the danger of frost will pass away in spring.

Overwintering potted lavender5645c-lavender

1. To overwinter lavenders growing in pots, move them inside if possible. If you’re using large pots and can’t move them inside, change their location. Place them in a warm and airy spot.

2. Water less, only when top two inches of soil dry out completely.

3. Don’t fertilize in the period of dormancy, mulch your pots heavily before winter arrives.



4 COMMENTS

  1. I wish I had read this article about over wintering my Lavender, before this years brutally cold winter we just survived here in Idaho….boy it was cold! We had snow on the ground for almost three months straight….I think it felt like Siberia! Anyway, when my husband gave me my Lavender tree, I kept saying, I was going to bring in it and overwinter it inside, because it was so beautiful and healthy. But I was informed by many helpful “garden experts” that I should just leave it outside. Much to my dismay, it died. I would have too if I had to endure the continuous freezing conditions my Lavender faced sitting sadly next to my front door. My husband has promised to give me two new Lavender trees this spring. Naturally I will follow your advice and bring them inside for future winters. Thanks again for your great article, I just wish I would have read it last fall.

  2. I saw beautiful lavender trees in Costco recently and I wonder if i could plant it in my garden. I live in Utah, Salt lake city. How should I care for them in the winter season. Hope I get some advice. Thanks.

  3. I have a unusual lavender problem. My shrub is two years old and i did trim it back last year but this is the end of June and the flowers are all fading Should i cut them back now? I live in Monterey, California

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